Not my favorite spot but the two mound sands raked to perfection and a thatched gate distinct Honen-in Temple from the rest of the temples in Kyoto, Japan. A very serene and secluded temple just 10-minute walk from Ginkaku-ji, Honen-in was established to honor Honen, the founder of the Jodo sect in 1681.

The temple is open to public throughout the year but the buildings of the temple are only open to the public twice a year, April 1 through 7 and November 1 to 7.

The famous entry to Honen-in Temple in Kyoto, Japan is a thatched gate.
The famous entry to Honen-in Temple in Kyoto, Japan is a thatched gate.
The two mound of sands at Honen-in Temple in Kyoto, Japan are called Byakusadan 白砂壇, symbolizing water that cleans the body and mind. Patterns on the top of the mounds are changed every four to five days.
The two mound of sands at Honen-in Temple in Kyoto, Japan are called Byakusadan 白砂壇, symbolizing water that cleans the body and mind. Patterns on the top of the mounds are changed every four to five days.
Closer view of Byakusadan 白砂壇, a raked mound of sand at Honen-in Temple in Kyoto, Japan. It symbolizes water that cleans the body and mind. Patterns on the top of the mounds are changed every four to five days.
Closer view of Byakusadan 白砂壇, a raked mound of sand at Honen-in Temple in Kyoto, Japan. It symbolizes water that cleans the body and mind. Patterns on the top of the mounds are changed every four to five days.
The Lecture Hall (講堂) at Honen-in Temple in Kyoto, Japan.
The Lecture Hall (講堂) at Honen-in Temple in Kyoto, Japan.
A monument at Honen-in Temple in Kyoto, Japan.
A monument at Honen-in Temple in Kyoto, Japan.
The stone bridge over Hojo-ike pond at Honen-in Temple in Kyoto, Japan.
The stone bridge over Hojo-ike pond at Honen-in Temple in Kyoto, Japan.
Honen-in 法然院 Temple in Kyoto, Japan.
Honen-in 法然院 Temple in Kyoto, Japan.

 

Check on Google Street View below for an additional information and perspective on Honen-in Temple:

 

 

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